Vineeta Chitale nee Nirmala Inamdar

vinita chitaleThe above photograph of Vineeta Chitale (1936-2017) was taken on her 80th birthday.  Vineeta Chitale was popularly known as Neelatai in family circles. Before marriage, Vineeta Chitale’s name was Nirmala Inamdar. She was the daughter of Purushottam (Pandit) Inamdar and Kusum Bhat. You can check out the Inamdar Family Tree.

Pandit Inamdar, her father, was the son of Godavari (Godutai) Inamdar nee Jatar. Godutai was popularly known as Mai in the family. She was the wife of Laxmanrao Inamdar and the daughter of Shriram Jatar. Godutai, Vineeta Chitale’s grandmother, was the sister of Kashinath Jatar (Bapurao), Janki Bhupatkar (Autai), Ranganath (Balasaheb), Nilkanth (Bhausaheb, Ambutai Bhatawadekar (she died early without children) and Vishnu (Abasaheb). You can check out the Jatar Family Tree.

Vineeta married Shyam Chitale and has two sons, Aditya and Devdutta Chitale. Aditya is a lawyer and he and his wife Madhumati (nee Patel) live in Mumbai and have one son, Riddhiman. Devdutta works for Tata Uganda and he and his wife Nilakshi (nee Patankar) have a daughter Tanvi and a son Nikhil.

Vineeta Chitale was one of the achievers in our family.  She was far ahead of her time. She worked as a medical social worker at the MGM Hospital, Parel. Later, she joined T.I.S.S. as a member of faculty, in the Deptt. of Medical and Psychiatric Social Work. After retirement, she worked in the Center for AIDS Research, Action and Training, T.I.S.S. (Tata Institue of Social Sciences). After that, she worked as an independent consultant and then Chair Professor on the Mahalakshmi Temple Trust. She has written research books for T.I.S.S. as well as academic papers.

The short write-up below was given by her daughter-in-law, Madhumati Chitale.

My Aiee..my mom in law. I miss her dearly..one of the strongest women I knew..and had the honour of knowing..steeped in culture..and fiercely independent..loved her family to a fault..her brothers adored her and grandchildren were delighted to be in her company..she in fact was a great conversationalist and had people of all ages engaged in a banter most times..loved to travel ..ready to spontaneously do things..a pioneer at work and much appreciated for her council. She all on all was a true modern woman.

The write-up below has been provided by her son, Devdatta Chitale:

Aai was very sincere in her work with a single minded doggedness towards any responsibility, work or project she took over.

She loved travelling so much that even at an age of 74 she quietly moved around in Kampala (without our knowledge) on two wheeler taxis, which I think was very daring and dangerous.

She touched hearts and minds of several persons during her long and illustrious career in Medical Social Work.

Actually she never retired as even at 79 she was still visiting Tata Institute (TISS) twice weekly, doing project work.

By the way she started in 1961 and was working till 2016.

To my wife she was more of a friend and a go to person rather than the ubiquitous Sasu maa

The grand-children just loved her as she was their Best Lawyer

She had a capacity to get the right gifts for each person according to his/her tastes and fancies.

She loved her family immensely and was very proud of her Inamdar and Bhat heritage.

I know she related well even with her second and third cousins and was in regular touch with many ( mamay-aatey baheen)

Within her community she was very respected and looked up as a “viduri” which she was.

Her greatest asset was she Listened to all her patients from alcoholics, trans-genders, drug abuse victims, AIDS patients and many such people having difficulties in their lives.

So many lives were transformed by her advice and support.

She was very much loved by all her family members and her relatives (especially her brothers she was their Tai)

Though she had a very tough career and life in general she was very happy and content in her last years.

Vinita Chitale (born on 19th April 1936) passed away on the 9th of January, 2017, in Kampala, Africa, of complications from a hip fracture. 

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