PMPL Driver Conductor Training by the Jatar Trust

The Vimalabai Jatar Charitable Trust has been funding the training of drivers and conductors for the past many years. The training happened this year too. The training takes place in several batches, of 24 drivers and 24 conductors in each batch (total 48) at IDTR, Pune (Institute of Driver Training and Research).

When the drivers and conductors work in pairs it improves communication. The training takes place over a period of two days.

PMPL2PMPL

Medha Jere conducted the role-play sessions. The drivers and conductors are put into difficult situations that they commonly face during their journey. For example, if a person with heavy luggage enters the bus and blocks the passage of other passengers.  Or when there is a conflict between passengers about seat-sharing. Or how to behave if a passenger complains of a missing wallet.

Here are a few videos from those sessions.

 

 

 

Samirran Jatar’s heroic win against a Russel’s Viper

Samirran was sitting on a rock at his friend’s farmhouse, talking on the phone when a Russell’s Viper bit him. The viper came from behind and put the fangs in deep into the right hand.

This snake is also one of the genera responsible for causing the most snakebite incidents and deaths among all venomous snakes on account of many factors, such as their wide distribution, generally aggressive demeanor, and frequent occurrence in highly populated areas

samirran(Samirran is the son of Dinkar (Kumar) Jatar. Kumar was the grand-son of Kashinath Shriram Jatar (Bapurao), who was the eldest son of Shriram Jatar,  (link to the family tree of Shriram.) Samirran has a brother, Udaiyan .)

Samirran then held the snake’s head with his left hand and tore the snake’s fangs out. While doing so, the fangs grazed his left thumb – and poison entered there too. This snake is usually 3-4 feet in length and has a stout body, so not easy to hold it.

He then held on to the snake because he says he knew that hospitals prefer to know which snake has bitten the patient.

What presence of mind and bravery!

His friend then drove him to the nearest hospital – with Samirran HOLDING ON TO THE LIVING SNAKE.

That hospital said they didn’t have anti-venom. Imagine what it must have been like to walk into a hospital reception with a living snake! Continue reading “Samirran Jatar’s heroic win against a Russel’s Viper”

The Hawa Mahal Murders – a contest winner!

N.J. Kulkarni’s The Hawa Mahal Murders is a contest winner and was launched at the Pune International Literary Festival on the 20th of September 2019 by Javed Akhtar.

JA

It’s a book with nail-biting suspense and here is a review from an unknown person:

This book is everything you would want in a detective murder mystery: suspense and well-rounded characters who you are invested in from the first page itself. Mumbai serves as a perfect backdrop to the story. Finished it in one sitting as I couldn’t put it down. A terrific, entertaining read.

Screenshot 2019-09-24 at 8.49.31 PM copy

The book did brisk business at PILF19, where it was launched. Here is the Amazon link to buy, and here is the Flipcart link. Right now, only the hard copy is available and only practical for those living in India to buy it. But the soft copy (ebook) will be available soon.

0baeaa06-aef2-47f5-9558-3af804de6e53

It has a good sales rank on Amazon as well, in the Crime/Thriller category, despite no preorders or advance reviews.

a0110d2c-0f47-4ac6-a958-15be2a9e7568.JPG

The story in the Hawa Mahal Murders can satisfy your appetite for suspense, mystery, Bollywood, blackmail, love…and seduction. It’s entertainment. A fun read, a thrilling whodunnit but without any gore or horror. It’s not a standard thriller or a detective novel. It’s not about some kind of puzzle that needs to be solved. You can call it a kind of psychological thriller.

But that’s not the only reason why the Hawa Mahal Murders is worth a buy.  Sure, there is adventure, mystery, and it keeps you turning the pages, but the Hawa Mahal Murders is actually about the important things in our lives, it’s about our values. It’s about friendship and to what extent we can go to, to help our best friends and how much we can sacrifice for those whom we love. It’s about being betrayed in love and then it’s about second chances.

It’s also about risking everything, one’s career, one’s life because of wanting to do the right thing. We all have it in us, this spot of heroism. It just requires the right circumstances to bring it out.

Once you start reading the Hawa Mahal Murders, you will find yourself getting sucked into their world, Smita’s world, Jai’s world, and you will find yourself rooting for them. You want them to succeed because they are fighting not just to survive, they are fighting for all that matters in this life. Integrity. Loyalty. Love.

You will be able to relate to these characters, maybe even love them, and I hope that they can also inspire you in some way.

Contributed by the author, N.J. Kulkarni. She is the daughter of Sudhir and Sarala Jatar and the grand-daughter of Bhausaheb, the son of Shriram Jatar. Nita also runs this family website.

Nitten Kirtane the tennis star!

IMG_2049Nitten Kirtane’s contribution to tennis has been exemplary over 4 decades whereby he has achieved at every level be it Junior Wimbledon runner up with Mahesh Bhupathi, Asian games bronze medallist, SAF Games medallist both in Chennai and Dhaka, Men’s no 1 in India, Davis cupper for 6 years, 4 time Men’s National Champion, 12 time Men’s Doubles Champion, 2 time ITF Men’s Singles Champion, 13 time ITF Men’s Doubles Champion and over 100 AITA titles.

Recently with his historic Silver Medal Win at the seniors World Championship held at Miami in 2018, he is ranked No. 1 in the Seniors in India today.

He recently was the coach of the Indian Railways team which won the Gold at the World Championship in Bulgaria. He is also a committee member of the MSLTA seniors team for promotion of tennis.

Lastly, I would like to highlight that he has 9 international medals and 16 national medals in his four-decade-long tennis career.

By Nitin’s wife, Rheeya

Nitten is the son of Mohini Kirtane. Her sister Mohini and brother Vijay are the children of Nalini (Nanutai) and MK Joshi. Nanutai was a Jatar girl, the daughter and only surviving child of Radha (nee Vatsala Mainkar) and Vasudev (Appasaheb) Jatar. Appasaheb was the son of Kashinath Jatar (Bapurao), who was the eldest child of Shriram Bhikaji Jatar. This family tree will explain it further.

Vineeta Chitale nee Nirmala Inamdar

vinita chitaleThe above photograph of Vineeta Chitale (1936-2017) was taken on her 80th birthday.  Vineeta Chitale was popularly known as Neelatai in family circles. Before marriage, Vineeta Chitale’s name was Nirmala Inamdar. She was the daughter of Purushottam (Pandit) Inamdar and Kusum Bhat. You can check out the Inamdar Family Tree.

Pandit Inamdar, her father, was the son of Godavari (Godutai) Inamdar nee Jatar. Godutai was popularly known as Mai in the family. She was the wife of Laxmanrao Inamdar and the daughter of Shriram Jatar. Godutai, Vineeta Chitale’s grandmother, was the sister of Kashinath Jatar (Bapurao), Janki Bhupatkar (Autai), Ranganath (Balasaheb), Nilkanth (Bhausaheb, Ambutai Bhatawadekar (she died early without children) and Vishnu (Abasaheb). You can check out the Jatar Family Tree.

Vineeta married Shyam Chitale and has two sons, Aditya and Devdutta Chitale. Aditya is a lawyer and he and his wife Madhumati (nee Patel) live in Mumbai and have one son, Riddhiman. Devdutta works for Tata Uganda and he and his wife Nilakshi (nee Patankar) have a daughter Tanvi and a son Nikhil.

Vineeta Chitale was one of the achievers in our family.  She was far ahead of her time. She worked as a medical social worker at the MGM Hospital, Parel. Later, she joined T.I.S.S. as a member of faculty, in the Deptt. of Medical and Psychiatric Social Work. After retirement, she worked in the Center for AIDS Research, Action and Training, T.I.S.S. (Tata Institue of Social Sciences). After that, she worked as an independent consultant and then Chair Professor on the Mahalakshmi Temple Trust. She has written research books for T.I.S.S. as well as academic papers.

The short write-up below was given by her daughter-in-law, Madhumati Chitale.

My Aiee..my mom in law. I miss her dearly..one of the strongest women I knew..and had the honour of knowing..steeped in culture..and fiercely independent..loved her family to a fault..her brothers adored her and grandchildren were delighted to be in her company..she in fact was a great conversationalist and had people of all ages engaged in a banter most times..loved to travel ..ready to spontaneously do things..a pioneer at work and much appreciated for her council. She all on all was a true modern woman.

The write-up below has been provided by her son, Devdatta Chitale:

Aai was very sincere in her work with a single minded doggedness towards any responsibility, work or project she took over.

She loved travelling so much that even at an age of 74 she quietly moved around in Kampala (without our knowledge) on two wheeler taxis, which I think was very daring and dangerous.

She touched hearts and minds of several persons during her long and illustrious career in Medical Social Work.

Actually she never retired as even at 79 she was still visiting Tata Institute (TISS) twice weekly, doing project work.

By the way she started in 1961 and was working till 2016.

To my wife she was more of a friend and a go to person rather than the ubiquitous Sasu maa

The grand-children just loved her as she was their Best Lawyer

She had a capacity to get the right gifts for each person according to his/her tastes and fancies.

She loved her family immensely and was very proud of her Inamdar and Bhat heritage.

I know she related well even with her second and third cousins and was in regular touch with many ( mamay-aatey baheen)

Within her community she was very respected and looked up as a “viduri” which she was.

Her greatest asset was she Listened to all her patients from alcoholics, trans-genders, drug abuse victims, AIDS patients and many such people having difficulties in their lives.

So many lives were transformed by her advice and support.

She was very much loved by all her family members and her relatives (especially her brothers she was their Tai)

Though she had a very tough career and life in general she was very happy and content in her last years.

Vinita Chitale (born on 19th April 1936) passed away on the 9th of January, 2017, in Kampala, Africa, of complications from a hip fracture. 

Four Jatar ladies of yesteryear

During the old days, taking a photograph was an event. People got dressed up and went to the studio. I can imagine how excited these lovely ladies must have been when they decked up in their finery and trooped to the studio.

This photo was probably clicked before 1927, because 1927 was the year when Indira Jatar got married.

From Left to Right: Kumud Jatar, Chani Jatar, Indira Jatar and Sarojini (Banutai [seated]).

4 ladies framed

Chani (Chandrabhaga) and Sarojini were sisters, daughters of Kashinath Jatar (Bapurao), who was the eldest son of Shriram Jatar. Sarojini married Narsimha Laxman Inamdar. Chani died early.

The ladies on either side of them are Kumud Jatar and Indira Jatar. Kumud Jatar was the daughter of Ranganath Jatar (Balasaheb), the son of Shriram Jatar who passed away very early when Kumud was a child. Later, Kumud married Shankarao Borgaonkar of Hyderabad. Indira Jatar was the daughter of Bhausaheb, and married Shri Bhalchandra Balkrishna Bhajekar. Thus, Kumud and Indira were the first cousins of Chandrabhaga and Sarojini.

I cannot help but wonder what these sisters and cousins talked about. They led stable and secure lives and had loving families so their hopes and dreams came true. Except for Chani, ofcourse.

Shriram’s Jatar’s last Will and Testament

This is Shriram Bhikaji Jatar’s Will. It was the 1800’s but our great grand-father (for some, their great-great-grandfather) made a Will. This is telling, considering that many people today in the 21st century don’t bother to do it.

Shriram wrote this when he was unwell. The five salient points from the Will are:

  1. Shriram Jatar was a self-made man. He willed only what he had earned himself. He got nothing from his father.
  2. He acquired real estate and also shares and promissory notes.
  3. In his Will he returned money which had been kept in his safe-keeping by his half-brother, and he returned it with interest. This speaks to the high integrity of this man.
  4. Everything in the Will is clear, including the liabilities. This made it simple for his heirs.
  5. He made provisions for his daughter who was unmarried at the time.

The actual Will is reproduced here in image form.

Shriram's Will 1Shriram's Will 2Shriram's Will 3Shriram's Will 4

(This Will was found in Bhausaheb’s papers and handed over to me by my father, Sudhir Jatar).