Vineeta Chitale nee Nirmala Inamdar

vinita chitaleThe above photograph of Vineeta Chitale (1936-2017) was taken on her 80th birthday.  Vineeta Chitale was popularly known as Neelatai in family circles. Before marriage, Vineeta Chitale’s name was Nirmala Inamdar. She was the daughter of Purushottam (Pandit) Inamdar and Kusum Bhat. You can check out the Inamdar Family Tree.

Pandit Inamdar, her father, was the son of Godavari (Godutai) Inamdar nee Jatar. Godutai was popularly known as Mai in the family. She was the wife of Laxmanrao Inamdar and the daughter of Shriram Jatar. Godutai, Vineeta Chitale’s grandmother, was the sister of Kashinath Jatar (Bapurao), Janki Bhupatkar (Autai), Ranganath (Balasaheb), Nilkanth (Bhausaheb, Ambutai Bhatawadekar (she died early without children) and Vishnu (Abasaheb). You can check out the Jatar Family Tree.

Vineeta married Shyam Chitale and has two sons, Aditya and Devdutta Chitale. Aditya is a lawyer and he and his wife Madhumati (nee Patel) live in Mumbai and have one son, Riddhiman. Devdutta works for Tata Uganda and he and his wife Nilakshi (nee Patankar) have a daughter Tanvi and a son Nikhil.

Vineeta Chitale was one of the achievers in our family.  She was far ahead of her time. She worked as a medical social worker at the MGM Hospital, Parel. Later, she joined T.I.S.S. as a member of faculty, in the Deptt. of Medical and Psychiatric Social Work. After retirement, she worked in the Center for AIDS Research, Action and Training, T.I.S.S. (Tata Institue of Social Sciences). After that, she worked as an independent consultant and then Chair Professor on the Mahalakshmi Temple Trust. She has written research books for T.I.S.S. as well as academic papers.

The short write-up below was given by her daughter-in-law, Madhumati Chitale.

My Aiee..my mom in law. I miss her dearly..one of the strongest women I knew..and had the honour of knowing..steeped in culture..and fiercely independent..loved her family to a fault..her brothers adored her and grandchildren were delighted to be in her company..she in fact was a great conversationalist and had people of all ages engaged in a banter most times..loved to travel ..ready to spontaneously do things..a pioneer at work and much appreciated for her council. She all on all was a true modern woman.

The write-up below has been provided by her son, Devdatta Chitale:

Aai was very sincere in her work with a single minded doggedness towards any responsibility, work or project she took over.

She loved travelling so much that even at an age of 74 she quietly moved around in Kampala (without our knowledge) on two wheeler taxis, which I think was very daring and dangerous.

She touched hearts and minds of several persons during her long and illustrious career in Medical Social Work.

Actually she never retired as even at 79 she was still visiting Tata Institute (TISS) twice weekly, doing project work.

By the way she started in 1961 and was working till 2016.

To my wife she was more of a friend and a go to person rather than the ubiquitous Sasu maa

The grand-children just loved her as she was their Best Lawyer

She had a capacity to get the right gifts for each person according to his/her tastes and fancies.

She loved her family immensely and was very proud of her Inamdar and Bhat heritage.

I know she related well even with her second and third cousins and was in regular touch with many ( mamay-aatey baheen)

Within her community she was very respected and looked up as a “viduri” which she was.

Her greatest asset was she Listened to all her patients from alcoholics, trans-genders, drug abuse victims, AIDS patients and many such people having difficulties in their lives.

So many lives were transformed by her advice and support.

She was very much loved by all her family members and her relatives (especially her brothers she was their Tai)

Though she had a very tough career and life in general she was very happy and content in her last years.

Vinita Chitale (born on 19th April 1936) passed away on the 9th of January, 2017, in Kampala, Africa, of complications from a hip fracture. 

Four Jatar ladies of yesteryear

During the old days, taking a photograph was an event. People got dressed up and went to the studio. I can imagine how excited these lovely ladies must have been when they decked up in their finery and trooped to the studio.

This photo was probably clicked before 1927, because 1927 was the year when Indira Jatar got married.

From Left to Right: Kumud Jatar, Chani Jatar, Indira Jatar and Sarojini (Banutai [seated]).

4 ladies framed

Chani (Chandrabhaga) and Sarojini were sisters, daughters of Kashinath Jatar (Bapurao), who was the eldest son of Shriram Jatar. Sarojini married Narsimha Laxman Inamdar. Chani died early.

The ladies on either side of them are Kumud Jatar and Indira Jatar. Kumud Jatar was the daughter of Ranganath Jatar (Balasaheb), the son of Shriram Jatar who passed away very early when Kumud was a child. Later, Kumud married Shankarao Borgaonkar of Hyderabad. Indira Jatar was the daughter of Bhausaheb, and married Shri Bhalchandra Balkrishna Bhajekar. Thus, Kumud and Indira were the first cousins of Chandrabhaga and Sarojini.

I cannot help but wonder what these sisters and cousins talked about. They led stable and secure lives and had loving families so their hopes and dreams came true. Except for Chani, ofcourse.

Nitya Gudi and Aditya Bhat wedding

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photo by Ravi Jatar at the reception

Nitya, the daughter of Prasad and Nandini Gudi and the grand-daughter of Sulabha Gudi (nee Inamdar) married Aditya in a lavish ceremony at Belgaon’s Fairfield Marriott. Nitya has a brother, Amogh, who lives in the US.

 

A Sangeet programme took place on the 25th of June 2019. The wedding was on the next day, the 26th of June, 2019. The reception was on the 29th of June at the Sheraton in Pune.

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(Photo by NJ Kulkarni at Belgaon)

Sulabha Gudi (the grandmother of Nitya, and the mother of Prasad Gudi) is the daughter of Sarojini Inamdar nee Jatar (Banutai). Banutai was the daughter of Kashinath Jatar (Bapurao), the eldest son of Shriram Jatar.

Sulabha Gudi has the Jatar bloodline from both her parents. Her mother, Sarojini Jatar, (Banutai) married her cousin, an Inamdar. Shriram Jatar’s daughter,  Godutai (Bapurao’s sister) who was married to Laxman Inamdar (popularly known as Babasaheb) had a son called Narsinha who married Banutai.

This is Godutai’s family tree, prepared by Vinita Chitale.

 

My Father – the Admiral

The article below has been written by Rajiv Inamdar, the son of Rear Admiral Yashwant Inamdar and Leela Raman. Rajiv is the grandson of Sarojini (Banutai), who was the daughter of Kashinath Jatar (Bapurao), who was the eldest son of Shriram Jatar. Banutai married NL Inamdar (Annasaheb).

My father was a man of many parts.Yashwant Inamdar

He graduated from the Royal Naval College Dartmouth and The Royal Naval Engineering College, Plymouth in the UK after 6 years of training where he specialised in Marine Engineering. He was a Fellow of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers, London, of the Institute of Marine Engineers, London and of the Institute of Engineers, India. He was also a graduate of the National Defence College. He also had a post-graduate diploma in taxation management from Jamnalal Bajaj Mumbai.

During his 32 year career in the Navy, he held many positions including that of Training Commander, in INS Shivaji, the Navy’s Engineering training establishment, where a building has been named after him and his handwritten technical notes on engineering subjects have been preserved for posterity in a glass exhibit. He was also the Director of Marine Engineering and head of the Navy’s Marine Engineering branch, the Asst Chief of Material at Naval Headquarters, Delhi and the Admiral Superintendent of the Naval Dockyard in Vizag where he managed 10,000 people.

A plaque below in the Centre of Marine Engineering Excellence in INS Shivaji, Lonavla that describes the exhibit in the building named after Rear Admiral Y N Inamdar.

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And below you will see a glass exhibit that contains the handwritten notes on technical subjects written by the Admiral.

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There are many handwritten notes on technical subjects that have been preserved for naval posterity by INS Shivaji, Lonavla.

He was the Chief Engineer on board the INS Brahmaputra, the first Indian Naval ship that crossed the Atlantic to go to Canada for Expo 1967

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He was also the Chairman of the Anti Missile Committee for the Ministry of Defence and a Member of the Expert team for Selection of Submarines from European countries

He was awarded an AVSM for his services to the Navy by the President of India which you can see in the photo on the right.

In his Annual Confidential Reports over the years his Commanding Officers described him as intelligent, modest, having excellent turnout and bearing , a good public speaker , writer, actor , debater and director( he directed a play called Sailor Beware which was a great hit!)  with outstanding power of expression , a natural leader, with a great sense of fairness and balance, bold with a charismatic personality, handsome, suave, polished, with good taste and colour coordination and totally incorruptible due to lack of greed.

I think that pretty much sums him up.

After retirement in 1982, he served on the National Committee for Quality Assurance which examined the working of 85 ordnance factories and took up a job as CEO of a French private sector company. This job didn’t really suit his incorruptible nature and the stress gave him a heart attack in 1987.

Following this, my parents spent a few short years with us after which they moved to Noida and then to their bungalow in Mhow where they spent several happy years. Following my mother’s illness in 2004, my parents moved in with us here in Beverly Park.

Dad could write very well and had a wonderful sense of humour. He contributed extensively to the Navy’s Quarterdeck magazine. He could also recite the entire Hanuman Chalisa from memory which he was able to do till a few months ago. His Midshipman’s journal, written in 1948/49 as a 20-year-old cadet is a fascinating description of geopolitical events of the times along with being a diary of the day’s events with beautiful handwriting and technical drawings.

My father has spent 15 years in this house with us and has been a big part of our lives. The deterioration is his health began a few years ago when he slowly lost mobility. The last few months were difficult for him due to two strokes from which he never really recovered.

Here are some tributes paid by his colleagues in the Navy

Admiral Britto – “Saddened at the loss of a great mentor, fellow engineer, and versatile personality of dignity and warmth who exuded personal and professional finesse. His Board awarded me my watchkeeping certificate”

Admiral Rajeev Paralikar – “I had the good fortune of serving on board INS Brahmaputra as his Senior Engineer Officer. He was a role model for me and was instrumental in shaping my career. I remain ever grateful to him”

Admiral BS Randhawa – “Very saddened as the passing away of your father. I had the good fortune of serving under him at an early stage of my career at the Institute of Armament Technology near Pune. I have not had a finer role model since. The world has lost a fine human being”

Admiral Vasant Koppikar – “Sorry to hear about the demise of your father whom I always held in high regard. A thorough gentleman, soft spoken and a good sense of humour. I have happy memories of our past Association in the Navy”

Admiral Sukul – Very sorry to learn about Admiral Inamdar. Such a wonderful human being and a great friend. RIP.

Admiral Radhakrishnan – “ Sorry to hear of the passing away of your dear father, a grand Admiral of the old Navy. May the noble soul rest in peace”

My father died at the ripe old age of 89 on 18 February 2019 after having lived a full life that is worth celebrating..

The article published above has also been published on this website called Atavist. Published below is a letter of condolence not available on the Atavist website:

letter

Even after many years after his retirement, the Chief of the Naval Staff wrote a condolence letter to Rajiv. This goes to show how well respected Yashwant Inamdar was in the Navy.

There is more about Rajiv Inamdar here and here, and these posts on the Inamdar Family Tree and a photograph of the Inamdar siblings will tell you a little more on the Inamdars.

Kaushal Inamdar – the renowned music composer

Screenshot 2018-10-22 at 7.35.44 AMMusic composer Kaushal Inamdar is not just a music composer, but also a poet, author and singer.  He has achieved fame and renown in his field – in Marathi as well as Hindi movies. He composes music for films, television, dramas, events, concerts, ballets, advertisements, and also albums. Kaushal has won dozens of awards Continue reading “Kaushal Inamdar – the renowned music composer”

Vishal Inamdar – a powerhouse of talent

Vishal Inamdar, the brother of music composer Kaushal Inamdar, and the son of Shrikrishna (Bal) Inamdar and Lalkari Biniwale, is a talented writer and director. Indeed, he is talent personified! His father, ShriKrishna (Bal) Inamdar, is the son of Sarojini Jatar (Banutai), the daughter of Kashinath Jatar (Bapurao), who was the eldest son of Shriram Jatar. Vishal has the Jatar bloodline from the Inamdar side as well. Shriram Jatar’s daughter, Godutai, married Laxman Inamdar (popularly known as Babasaheb). This is Godutai’s family tree, prepared by Vinita Chitale. Godutai’s son Narsinha married Sarojini Jatar, Vishal’s grandmother. Continue reading “Vishal Inamdar – a powerhouse of talent”